Last edited by Mauzilkree
Wednesday, October 7, 2020 | History

8 edition of Nahuas and Spaniards found in the catalog.

Nahuas and Spaniards

postconquest central Mexican history and philology

by James Lockhart

  • 55 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Stanford University Press, UCLA Latin American Center Publications, University of California, Los Angeles in Stanford, Calif, [Los Angeles] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Mexico,
  • Tlaxcala (Mexico : State),
  • Tulancingo (Hidalgo, Mexico)
    • Subjects:
    • Nahuas -- Historiography.,
    • Nahuas -- Government relations.,
    • Nahuatl language -- Historiography.,
    • Nahuatl language -- Grammar, Comparative.,
    • Nahuatl language -- Texts.,
    • Mexico -- History -- Spanish colony, 1540-1810.,
    • Tlaxcala (Mexico : State) -- Historiography.,
    • Tulancingo (Hidalgo, Mexico) -- Historiography.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementJames Lockhart.
      SeriesUCLA Latin American studies ; ;
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsF1219.76.H57 L63 1991
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiii, 304 p. :
      Number of Pages304
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1532274M
      ISBN 100804719535, 0804719543
      LC Control Number91009895

      The Death of Moctezuma, from the Florentine Codex, Book (Wikimedia Commons) The Florentine Codex, originally entitled Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España (General History of Matters in New Spain), is a bilingual Nahuatl – Spanish encyclopedic text, composed between and This vast work documents in 12 books the religion, natural history, . This book just appeared as I was finishing this project. It is a collection of primary sources from the Nahuas and the Spaniards. This book will allow students without access to computers to complete the assignment that is on the Internet. It is useful to compare my hypermedia narrative with a similar narrative in the linear format inherent in.

        Nahuas had a cultivated corporate identity; the Spaniards also enjoyed common identification, but it was determined by a very different sort of social exclusivity. 3 Brought to me by accident at the Archivo Histórico in the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City, I glanced through the Buena Muerte manuscript as I waited for the page to Cited by: Historian James Lockhart built on that work, publishing The Nahuas After the Conquest in He divides the colonial history of the Nahua into three stages largely based on linguistic evidence in local-level Nahuatl sources, which he posits are an index of the degree of interaction between Spaniards and Nahuas and changes in Nahua culture.

      Victors and Vanquished: Spanish and Nahua Views of the Conquest of Mexico Article in The History Teacher 34(3) May with Reads How we measure 'reads'. The Florentine Codex, originally entitled Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España (General History of Matters in New Spain), is a bilingual Nahuatl – Spanish encyclopedic text, composed between and This vast work documents in 12 books the religion, natural history, cultural practices and first decades of the fall of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica.


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Nahuas and Spaniards by James Lockhart Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology. The Nahua Indians of central Mexico (often misleadingly called Aztecs after the quite ephemeral confederation that existed among them in late pre-Hispanic times) were the most populus of Mesoamerica's cultural-linguistic groups at the time of the Spanish conquest/5(4).

Lockhart, author of several useful books on Nahuatl language and history, has produced this collection of scholarly essays on various aspects of the interaction between the indigenous Nahuas and the Hispanic hegemony in Mexico.

Contents: NAHUAS NAHUATL PHILOLOGY HISTORIOGRAPHY SPANIARDSCited by: Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology. The Nahua Indians of central Mexico (often misleadingly called Aztecs after the quite ephemeral confederation that existed among them in late pre-Hispanic times) were the most populus of Mesoamerica's cultural-linguistic groups at the time of the Spanish conquest.

In bringing Nahuas and Spaniards together in this study, the book explores the changing contours of their relationship in Central Mexico, emphasizing informal interethnic contact in the making of both the Spanish colonial economy and postconquest Nahua society. This collection of thirteen essays (five of them previously unpublished) by the leading authority on the postconquest Nahuas and Nahua-Spanish interaction brings /5(4).

In bringing Nahuas and Spaniards together in this study, the book explores the changing contours of their relationship in Central Mexico, emphasizing informal interethnic contact in the making of both the Spanish colonial economy and postconquest Nahua : Rebecca Horn.

After invading highland Guatemala inSpaniards claimed to have smashed the Kaqchikel and K’iche’ Maya kingdoms and to have forged a new colony—with their leader, Pedro de Alvarado, as Guatemala’s conquistador.

This volume shows that the real story of the Spanish invasion was very different. Designed to be an accessible introduction to the topic as well as a. The foremost Nahuatl conquest account is Book Twelve of the Florentine Codex.

In this monumental work, Fray Bernardino de Sahagún commissioned Nahuas to collect and record in their own language accounts of the conquest of Mexico; he then added a parallel Spanish account that is part summary, part elaboration of the Nahuatl.

Náhuatl (pronounced NAH-wah-tuhl) was the language spoken by the people of the Aztec Empire, known as the Aztec or Mexica. Although the spoken and written form of the language has substantively changed from the prehispanic classical form, Nahuatl has persevered for half a : Nicoletta Maestri.

This book is not for the faint of heart. Lockhart, has an near insider grasp of early Nahuatl language and culture. He must eat breath and sleep the culture to have such an in-depth knowledge.

This is primarily a reference work showcasing the continuity or Aztec culture from the pre to post conquest period.4/5. Very good. NAHUAS AND SPANIARDS: POSTCONQUEST CENTRAL MEXICAN HISTORY AND By James VG. Book is in Very Good Condition.

Text will be unmarked. May show some signs of use or wear. Will include dust jacket if it originally came with one. Satisfaction is guaranteed with every order/5(3).

Figure-- Preface-- Map-- Part I. Nahuas: 1. Postconquest Nahua society and culture seen through Nahuatl sources Complex municipalities: Tlaxcala and Tulancingo in the sixteenth century Views of corporate self and history in some valley of Mexico towns, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries-- Part II.

Nahuatl Philology: 4. And Ana wept Classical Nahuatl Wikibook. Welcome to the Classical Nahuatl Wikibook. Here you can learn the language that was spoken by the Aztecs in the valley of Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest and during the subsequent centuries, which has survived through a multitude of written sources written by Nahuas and Spaniards.

Lockhart, author of several useful books on Nahuatl language and history, has produced this collection of scholarly essays on various aspects of the interaction between the indigenous Nahuas and the Hispanic hegemony in Mexico/5(2).

Click to read more about Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology (Ucla Latin American Studies, Vol 76) by James Lockhart. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers4/5.

Book 12 of the Florentine Codex narrates the Spanish invasion of Mexico, –, in Nahuatl and from the point of view of the Nahuas who witnessed (and later wrote down a narrative of) the events. This book was edited by a Spanish friar, Bernardino de Sahagún, in the second half of the sixteenth century in central Mexico (not in Oaxaca.

Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology by James Lockhart starting at $ Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology has 2 available editions to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xiii, pages: 1 map ; 24 cm. Contents: 1. Nahuas. Postconquest Nahua society and culture seen through Nahuatl sources --Complex municipalities: Tlaxcala and Tulancingo in the sixteenth century --Views of corporate self and history in some valley of Mexico towns.

As a part of their missionary efforts, members of various religious orders (principally Franciscan and Dominican friars and Jesuits) introduced the Latin alphabet to the Nahuas. Within the first twenty years after the Spanish arrival, texts were being prepared in the Nahuatl language written in Latin characters.

Simultaneously, schools were founded, such as the Colegio de Santa Cruz Language family: Uto-Aztecan, NahuanNahuatl. Susan Schroeder, editor of The Conquest All Over Again: Nahuas and Zapotecs Thinking, Writing, and Painting Spanish Colonialism “This book emerges from a scholarly utilization of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century primary sources to illuminate not only very complex Nahua thought and practices but also the colonial context that shaped the Brand: Duke University Press Books.

Postconquest Coyoacan: Nahua-Spanish Relations in Central Mexico, By Rebecca Horn. Read preview. Synopsis. This book studies Nahuas and Spaniards in the central Mexican jurisdiction of Coyoacan from the Spanish conquest untilcrafting a multidimensional portrait of their relations in both institutional and informal settings.After invading highland Guatemala inSpaniards claimed to have smashed the Kaqchikel and K&’iche&’ Maya kingdoms and to have forged a new colony&—with their leader, Pedro de Alvarado, as Guatemala&’s conquistador.

This volume shows that the real story of the Spanish invasion was very different. Designed to be an accessible introduction to the topic as well as a .‎For many generations, the Nahuas of Mexico maintained their tradition of the xiuhpohualli.

or "year counts," telling and performing their history around communal firesides so that the memory of it would not be lost. When the Spaniards came, young Nahuas took the Roman letters taught to them by the f.